Writer's Block, Book Burnout and Podcasts

So content has been rather sparse here of late. Sorry about that.  I have started a new job and it is seemingly sucking all the energy out of my brain.  When I get home I just don’t have the inspiration to write reviews.  Add in the fact that I have been reading some complex non-fiction and I just procrastinate and put off trying to write anything.

I periodically get in a funk like this where nothing quite seems to “work” for me and I find myself reading three or four books at one time looking for something that will connect or get the juices flowing again; something that compels me to write because I want to get my opinion down rather than writing because I haven’t written anything here for a while. You have heard this before if you have been reading me for any length of time (I guess I am sorry about that too …).

What makes these episodes even more awkward is that I don’t have a lot of other hobbies. I don’t watch a lot of TV or movies nor do I play video games or have a lot of other distractions. So when books and reading are not working I really feel lost.  Maybe I should get some exercise or something. Go outside and breathe the fresh air … Nope, mostly I waste time on Twitter and Facebook.

Do you have these episodes where nothing you read seems to connect and you don’t feel like writing anything?

I have read a couple of short stories and some mythology  for young adults but haven’t been able to work up the energy to write about these books but will try to do so soon. These funks come and go.

The good news for you, dear reader, is that in an attempt to break out of this funk I decided to return to the podcast format and interview some authors. This week I will post interviews with Joseph Bottum, author of An Anxious Age, and talk with one of my favorite authors, Olen Steinhauer, about this latest book The Cairo Affair. Which what kinda ties the title of this post together in case you were wondering.

So I hope you will forgive the radio silence and come back for the podcasts with these interesting authors.  And, as always, thanks for reading.

Peter Schweizer on Congress, Insider Trading and Sweetheart deals for public officials

UPDATE: Sorry, here is a direct link to the podcast.

On today’s edition of Coffee and Markets, Pejman Yousefzadeh and I are joined by Peter Schweizer to discuss his book Throw Them All Out detailing how politicians get away with insider trading, sleazy land deals and more.

Peter Schweizer on Congress, Insider Trading and Sweetheart deals for public officials

UPDATE: Sorry, here is a direct link to the podcast.

On today’s edition of Coffee and Markets, Pejman Yousefzadeh and I are joined by Peter Schweizer to discuss his book Throw Them All Out detailing how politicians get away with insider trading, sleazy land deals and more.

In the Mail: What Would Rob Do?

What Would Rob Do: An Irreverent Guide to Surviving Life’s Daily Indignities by Rob Sachs

Publishers Weekly

A producer, reporter and director for popular NPR programs like Morning Edition and All Things Considered, Sachs found a personal connection to his audience through his quirky advice podcast series, “What Would Rob Do?” Expanding on that series, Sachs presents a guide to dealing with daily dilemmas and embarrassing snafus, from parenting (“Annoying Kids’ Music”) to dating (“Avoiding a Chick Flick”), socializing (“Underdressed for a Party?”), personal hygiene (“Combing the Coif”), and the places they intersect (“I Clogged the Toilet and I’m at a Party! What Would Rob Do?”). In addition to his own funny, direct take on a myriad of issues, Sachs also consults with experts (or whatever one would call Fabio), and manages some genuinely useful advice (his take on emailing is especially timely and on point). Though it loses something in the translation from audio to print, and fans may find it more of the same, readers should find this a funny and (more often than not) helpful take on the common pitfalls of modern life.