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Tag: Medal of Honor

A Tiger among Us by Bennie G. Adkins and Katie Lamar Jackson

A Tiger Among Us: A Story of Valor in Vietnam’s A Shau Valley by Bennie G. Adkins and Katie Lamar Jackson tells of Adkins’ life (primarily his military career with an emphasis on his Vietnam War experiences).

It is an easy read, but describes Adkins’ exploits as a Special Forces soldier in Vietnam. The book primarily focuses on how Adkins survived his Special Forces camp being overrun by the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army in the Battle of A Shau. Many of his comrades were killed or wounded, including Adkins, but through determination and grit the survivors fought off the enemy until they were extracted. As a result of his actions, Adkins was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

The authors also chronicle Adkins’ work with the highly classified Studies and Observation Group (SOG). The Group was a multi-service special operations group that conducted covert operations in Southeast Asia. His work with SOG combined with his Special Forces work paint a picture of a man who was dedicated to his country and fellow service members and did all that he could to complete his assignments with the utmost success.

Although the writing is a bit awkward at times, it is overall a good read. After reading Adkins’ account of the Battle of A Shau, I want to read other perspectives of the Battle to get a fuller understanding of it.

Noble Warrior: The Life and Times of Maj. Gen. James E. Livingston

I have recently read two books on the Vietnam War. The first of these, Noble Warrior: The Life and Times of Maj. Gen. James E. Livingston, USMC (Ret.), Medal of Honor by James E. Livingston, Colin D. Heaton, and Anne-Marie Lewis, is a biography of Major General James E. Livingston – a Marine who was awarded the Medal of Honor in the Vietnam War. The book is a quick read at 272 pages. It includes 23 b/w photographs and seven maps (which are very helpful in following the action in the book).

A majority of the book is spent on Livingston’s time in Vietnam, specifically the battle for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor – the Battle of Dai Do in 1968. The main battle pitted a reinforced Marine battalion (2nd Battalion/4th Marine Regiment) against a significant portion of a North Vietnamese Army division. In the battle, Livingston commanded a company.

I won’t go into the details of the battle, but the phrase “uncommon valor was a common virtue” was prevalent on the battlefield. Livingston’s leadership appears to have made a difference in saving not only many of the lives in his company, but also in his battalion. The book is a good narrative of what occurred during the battle from the American perspective.

Noble Warrior: The Life and Times of Maj. Gen. James E. Livingston

I have recently read two books on the Vietnam War. The first of these, Noble Warrior: The Life and Times of Maj. Gen. James E. Livingston, USMC (Ret.), Medal of Honor by James E. Livingston, Colin D. Heaton, and Anne-Marie Lewis, is a biography of Major General James E. Livingston – a Marine who was awarded the Medal of Honor in the Vietnam War. The book is a quick read at 272 pages. It includes 23 b/w photographs and seven maps (which are very helpful in following the action in the book).

A majority of the book is spent on Livingston’s time in Vietnam, specifically the battle for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor – the Battle of Dai Do in 1968. The main battle pitted a reinforced Marine battalion (2nd Battalion/4th Marine Regiment) against a significant portion of a North Vietnamese Army division. In the battle, Livingston commanded a company.

I won’t go into the details of the battle, but the phrase “uncommon valor was a common virtue” was prevalent on the battlefield. Livingston’s leadership appears to have made a difference in saving not only many of the lives in his company, but also in his battalion. The book is a good narrative of what occurred during the battle from the American perspective.

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