What are your book blog recommendations?

Twitter
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I asked the following question on Twitter and then realized the 140 character limit might make it hard to answer:

What  are 5 book/literary blogs you think are under-appreciated? And 5 that you couldn’t live without?

So consider this post a chance to answer the question with as many characters as you need.

(Don’t be shy, feel free to recommend yourself.)

The World According to Twitter by David Pogue

The World According To TwitterI am sure there are a few of you out there who have had to explain what exactly Twitter is and why it is worth the effort (or perhaps there are people reading this who are asking these type of questions themselves).

Well, David Pogue (and his 500,000 followers) takes a shot at an explanation via example in The World According to Twitter.  Here is the publisher’s explanation of the book:

New York Times technology columnist David Pogue has tapped into the brilliance of his half-million followers on Twitter by posting a different, thought-provoking question every night. The questions ranged from the earnest (“What’s your greatest regret?”) to the creative (“Make up a concept for a doomed TV show”) to the curious (“What’s your great idea to improve the cell phone?”). Out of 25,000 tweets, Pogue has gathered the very best 2,524 into this irresistible, clever, laugh-out-loud funny book. The World According to Twitter is truly a grand social networking experiment, in which thousands of voices have come together to produce a unique and wonderful record of shared human experience.

Whether you think a book like this is worth ten bucks or not is highly subjective of course.  Your sense of humor and taste in general will determine how valuable you find a collection like this to be. (I received a free copy of this book so make of that what you will. Hi, FTC!)

But one thing I like about the book is that it highlights how creative and interactive Twitter can be.  There are probably a great many folks who just tweet mundane happenings in their lives, and there are obviously a fair amount of spammers and hacks, but there are also a great many funny, creative, and insightful people.

By asking questions and reproducing the best responses Pogue has produced a paper trail as it were illustrating this brighter side of the Twitter phenomenon.  From movie sequels and prequels to puns and jokes to real life expriences people find a way to pack quite a punch into 140 characters or less.

Part humor, part sociology, part folk art, part social networking The World According to Twitter is an interesting slice of culture while at the same time an explanation for the popularity and often addictive nature of Twitter.

The World According to Twitter by David Pogue

The World According To TwitterI am sure there are a few of you out there who have had to explain what exactly Twitter is and why it is worth the effort (or perhaps there are people reading this who are asking these type of questions themselves).

Well, David Pogue (and his 500,000 followers) takes a shot at an explanation via example in The World According to Twitter.  Here is the publisher’s explanation of the book:

New York Times technology columnist David Pogue has tapped into the brilliance of his half-million followers on Twitter by posting a different, thought-provoking question every night. The questions ranged from the earnest (“What’s your greatest regret?”) to the creative (“Make up a concept for a doomed TV show”) to the curious (“What’s your great idea to improve the cell phone?”). Out of 25,000 tweets, Pogue has gathered the very best 2,524 into this irresistible, clever, laugh-out-loud funny book. The World According to Twitter is truly a grand social networking experiment, in which thousands of voices have come together to produce a unique and wonderful record of shared human experience.

Whether you think a book like this is worth ten bucks or not is highly subjective of course.  Your sense of humor and taste in general will determine how valuable you find a collection like this to be. (I received a free copy of this book so make of that what you will. Hi, FTC!)

But one thing I like about the book is that it highlights how creative and interactive Twitter can be.  There are probably a great many folks who just tweet mundane happenings in their lives, and there are obviously a fair amount of spammers and hacks, but there are also a great many funny, creative, and insightful people.

By asking questions and reproducing the best responses Pogue has produced a paper trail as it were illustrating this brighter side of the Twitter phenomenon.  From movie sequels and prequels to puns and jokes to real life expriences people find a way to pack quite a punch into 140 characters or less.

Part humor, part sociology, part folk art, part social networking The World According to Twitter is an interesting slice of culture while at the same time an explanation for the popularity and often addictive nature of Twitter.

Quote of the Day: Book Blogging's Golden Age

Be sure to read Mark Athitakis: The Way of the Litblog.  This quote is worth the price of admission:

I suspect that when somebody says that blogging had a “golden age,” the person means that there was a time (circa 2002) when it felt new and exciting, and the media wanted to do stories about it, and some people got a lot of attention really quickly (book deals! movie options!), and everybody got to have lively discussions and post pictures of puppies or argue about string theory, and it was a thrill because we all had a brand-new toy to play with and we knew who was reading us and we were finally, finally, getting some interesting e-mail. That moment has passed, so it’s easy for media folk to say blogging is old hat and move on to the new. But blogging remains a valid form, and Twitter is no replacement for it. (Twitter is more a supplemental form, I think—a supplement to a supplement.) What other online format besides blogging allows people to write at various lengths, distribute to a wide audience, and spark conversations? I suppose Facebook might qualify, but it’s a poor vehicle for lengthy, considered thought, and its system is designed to push your ideas only to your closest friends. If blogging is over, nobody’s created a suitable replacement for what blogging does.