Avid Readers, Occasional Bloggers

Tag: Climate change

James Delingpole on Watermelons: The Green Movement’s True Colors

On today’s edition of Coffee and Markets, Pejman Yousefzadeh and I were joined by James Delingpole to discuss his book Watermelons: The Green Movement’s True Colors. We discussed the arguments for and against global warming and the possibility for a different and better approach to science and scientific inquiry.

Listen to the podcast.

Birthmarked by Caragh O'Brien

One of the great things about book blogging is that you sometimes get books in the mail unexpectedly. And sometimes you aren’t quite sure what you want to read next, then a book appears and you think: “Hey, that looks interesting I’ll read that.” This is exactly how I came to read Birthmarked an interesting dystopian novel centered on birth and family interaction.

Here is the publishers blurb:

After climate change, on the north shore of Unlake Superior, a dystopian world is divided between those who live inside the wall, and those, like sixteen-year-old midwife Gaia Stone, who live outside. It’s Gaia’s job to “advance” a quota of infants from poverty into the walled Enclave, until the night one agonized mother objects, and Gaia’s parents disappear.

As Gaia’s efforts to save her parents take her within the wall, she faces the brutal injustice of the Enclave and discovers she alone holds the key to a secret code, a code of “birthmarked” babies and genetic merit.

Fraught with difficult moral choices and rich with intricate layers of codes, BIRTHMARKED explores a colorful, cruel, eerily familiar world where a criminal is defined by her genes, and one girl can make all the difference.

This was one of those books that I enjoyed but it didn’t totally grab me – in the “Hmm, that’s interesting” rather than the “You gotta read this!” category.

Birthmarked by Caragh O'Brien

One of the great things about book blogging is that you sometimes get books in the mail unexpectedly. And sometimes you aren’t quite sure what you want to read next, then a book appears and you think: “Hey, that looks interesting I’ll read that.” This is exactly how I came to read Birthmarked an interesting dystopian novel centered on birth and family interaction.

Here is the publishers blurb:

After climate change, on the north shore of Unlake Superior, a dystopian world is divided between those who live inside the wall, and those, like sixteen-year-old midwife Gaia Stone, who live outside. It’s Gaia’s job to “advance” a quota of infants from poverty into the walled Enclave, until the night one agonized mother objects, and Gaia’s parents disappear.

As Gaia’s efforts to save her parents take her within the wall, she faces the brutal injustice of the Enclave and discovers she alone holds the key to a secret code, a code of “birthmarked” babies and genetic merit.

Fraught with difficult moral choices and rich with intricate layers of codes, BIRTHMARKED explores a colorful, cruel, eerily familiar world where a criminal is defined by her genes, and one girl can make all the difference.

This was one of those books that I enjoyed but it didn’t totally grab me – in the “Hmm, that’s interesting” rather than the “You gotta read this!” category.

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